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The Harvest
The Harvest

Episode · 2 years ago

Ep.030 - The Director of Photography & Script Relationship

ABOUT THIS EPISODE

We are taking a unique approach to the exploration of script and story. After having spent four weeks dissecting how an actor breaks down a screenplay, via study, observation, research and technical preparations; we are now going to look through the lens and the POV of the DOP: Director of Photography (DP) and their relationship to the roadmap known as the script (oh such wonderful puns await us!)

DPs occupy a very sacred space in the creative movie making process. He/she is the individual closest to the story being told. They’re the first and most intimate outsider receiving what’s being created (specifically when they’re not just a DP but also an operator) and are therefore the first audience. But because the DP is such a crucial influencer of story, they're thrust into a unique relationship with the filmmaking process - as an audience they must be passive to receive, but as a DP they must be active in the modeling of the story.

Today we’re going to take a look at this dichotomy, as well as the many nuances that go into this relationship.

Hello, hi, how you doing? I'm good man. How are you good? Hello, every want to welcome to the harvest, where we discuss all things cinema and story. And as we learn, you learn, as we grow, you grow. My Name's Xavier Garcia. I'm Jonathan Garcia. Hello, Jonathan. This is episode thirty. Yes, it is throwing you off. Yeah, you said like a robot. There sounds like. Wow, there's this episode thirty. We're taking a unique approach to the exploration of script and story, after having spent we spent four weeks, you know, for weeks talking about actors and awesome and it was good. We're trying to dissect, you know, just kind of like how actors break down stream play, how they you know, how there's how they study, their observation, their research, their technical preparations. But we're not going to look through the Lens and the Pov of the DOP. See what I did there? I like that he'll be of the time op, the the director of photography and their relationship to the road map known as the script. Oh, such wonderful puns await us on this episode. Okay, so I'm not going to call it doop because that is not the industry acronym is just DP, TP svind. All right, so DP's occupy a very sacred space in the creative movie making process. They are the one individual that is closest to the story being told. They're the first and the most intimate outsider that's receiving what's being created. Specifically, when they're not just a DPEP but also an operator, and therefore they're they become the very first audience member because, but because the DP is such a critical and crucial influence or of story, they're thrust into a very unique relationship with the filmmaking process. As an audience, they must be passive in order to receive, but as a DP they must be active in the modeling of the story, and today we're going to take a look at this dichotomy, as well as the many nuances that go into this relationship between DP and script. It's exact. Yeah, cool, let's stop there for a second. Let's just talk about I'm not even going to get into the notes just yet, because right away we talk about like the prep in the process of a DP. But before we get into the through it that, I want to talk a little bit about of the DP and how you feel, you personally feel as being like the first audience member, because on any given set you've got your actors in front of you and they're acting and you've got the camera that's separating you, if you're an operator, if you're DP, because not all DPS operate, but in indie films usually the DP is the operator as well, and you'll see it sometimes in Hollywood. Just sad he can get behind the yeah, yeah, I mean, if you can work your way around union rules and all that stuff, absolutely um, but in indie filmmaking, nine out of ten times the DP is the operator, and so you've got your actors in front of you that are performing the scene, you've got the camera that's in between you and them and then there's you going through the eyepiece or monitor, and you're the first audience you become the very first audience member. I mean they're acting into the machine that you're holding, so it's almost like it's going through the machine and into you. That that's a special, really privileged spot. No one has that spot. Yeah, you know, absolutely, I think that. I mean, other than the fact that most of the Times the director is on their monitor and yeah, but they're on a monitor, right or handheld monitor, you know what I mean, and they're either on the scene. But I think that the director is depending on the cinematographer, the DP, to be able to record and it and in we're record the experience that the audience wants should have. So, for instance, you, as the DP, are looking through that Lens and are I have to be able to make sure that you're capturing exactly what what needs to be captured for the audiences. You know, sort of looking for experience. Experience. Yeah, experience. And have you ever felt like look, when you're looking through that Len's that like you like, wow, I'm really special right now, like I'm I'm this, all of this is happening. Because, look, at the end of the day, the actor is very aware of the you know, the camera, like where's the camera? Like they're acting. You know they're acting, for they're not going to be like have their back to the camera and you know, like the blocking has settled that. But then like even in the nuances, in the moment, small moments of you know, just like blocking, where the actor is so in the moment that they that they're just being they I still have...

...a soft focus to where the camera is right, and so, like all of it is being put to the camera so that the audience members, when that signal gets turned into a visual experience, you're the first one there in that moment receiving that. You know, I don't know, I feel that it's a principle. It is really it is a privilege, because you're the first one handling the visual you're handling the movement and the control or the concept of what the world's going to experience. So it is a privilege in the sense that, you know, the DP is the one controlling the visual of the of the film, the purpose of the film. He's controlling the purpose of everything that is being done in production, you know, the the footage that's being recorded, because there's so many elements to the story. You know, it's not just the story that's on paper, it's then when that story comes to life, right, and a visual medium, every camera movement, every color choice, like all that stuff, you know. But like, at the end of the day, it's what's in the frame, right, right in the frame, and you're the one setting that frame. So I don't know, I always thought about that, you know, especially just like listening to some podcast recently, just kind of coming becoming aware of the position in the space and place that a DP holds, which is even more intimate to the acting and the actors and the director himself. And yet the director works with the actress, and just thought that was unique, I to me. I don't know, yeah, it's interesting. I think what's also very cool about the DP is not just the frame and being behind the camera, but controlling light, because, I mean, as a Christian, I think about, you know, a light bear, Jesus, being a light bear and bringing light and bringing, you know, the message and the joy of the message out the story of the Gospel. And I think about when you are in a set and you are you are literally decorating with light, so that exactly what needs to be seen on camera is what the audience is taking in. Nothing more, nothing less. And when you're shaping light to get because you can have a light in a room and record it and the scene looks absolutely horrible, but when you're artistically moving light around, you are decorating and you're using light just like to tell a story. Yeah, and exactly, ambience, exactly, and so that one of the one of the greatest things. A good DP is not just a person who can be behind the camera up because nowadays these cameras are amazing, you know, and you can shoot is actually black. You can and you know you'll capture some mean if the actors are amazing, you can. Anyone could do it. But it's shaping the light to be able to tell the story and being able to artistically, you know, shape and mold and give give life to elements and everything just with light. Yeah, so that's really cool as well. Okay, so now let's go a little bit into just kind of the relationship that the DP has with the script, because there's a there's a long love hate relationship that goes on. I don't know so much hate, but you know there's a there's there are hills and valleys in this relationship and how the DP relates to that document that is the script, right this blueprint to the making of a movie, and there's a lot of ebbs and flows throughout the process of creation or even through the prep process before you even begin to actually shoot. There's a ton that goes into the relationship that the DP has with the script, and it begins with well, you just got a script, you gotta read it. Yeah, right, it's the very first sting. You are your handed a script. You read it. Now, can you tell me what goes to your mind when you're reading a script as far as whether or not you choose you want to do it you don't want to do it? I mean, set aside the fact that like nine out of the ten that you know, ten scripts that come to your table, across your your hands, are your own, you know, or they're off their inhouse, but there's those occasional out you know ones. Like when you're reading these scripts, what goes through your mind as far as yeah, this is it, or no, this isn't it. Yeah, I mean you're told to kind of do a fun read, kind of just read it, try not to to be a DP when you're reading it and try to understand it, understand the stories your work takes you. I mean, really good top's can't help it. They st I mean people who love stories will automatically start building fault Oh man, this should be yeah, well, love to see you like this. Songs in their writing notes along the script or you know. But a lot of times you'll see people who really love the screet script read it multiple times. I mean I you keep reading and reading and reading, because you are trying to get in the mind of the director. Yeah, you got to understand what he's thinking, what he wants. I mean the writer has given us the story, but the moment it is given to someone else,...

...if the writer's not the director, the moment that it's landed in the director's hand, it's his imagination. So you have to look at this and you have to ax how I mean you and I, I mean we have such a great relationship. So the moment that we're on set, you know, I know exactly how to capture what we've discussed, what we've and talked all of a lot about it too. And and and it's a little different also for you and I, because we are also are the writers. You know, you and I sit down, we're writing this thing, we're hashing it out, and so all that, all those issues, is that woe that we've already discussed the writing process. The moment we're on set is actually, this shouldn't be much talking really. It should just be bang, Bang Bang kind of going. That's why a lot of people, when they're in our sets, they say it's you know, it's real start, Terry, a mild and Bang, Bang, Bang. But you know, it's not like we're yelling at people get down and turn on those lights. You know. No, no, it's more so do you know what you want? That there's a that like. Yeah, exactly. There's a disciplines as an assurance, as a confidence. Yeah, and everybody's held to a standard of professionalism because we are holding ourselves up to the highest. Absolutely. So it's exciting to answer your question that the moment you know the script that you want, that you want to do, is when you know, when you already thinking of shot ideas, you already are. It brings this joy into you. You know you want to be attached to the project because it connects with you or the message connects with you, or you want to make sure it gets out to the world. Yeah, you know. Sometimes, you know, you have to also know your your you know your abilities. You know if you can handle such a script. You know, I know all the time Deacon says that all the movies he's ever done he couldn't. You didn't know if you could handle him. But that's the great thing about it. You know, a DPS, you enter into these films, into these scripts and you're constantly growing and re venting yourself. So, aside from the story and how you relate or feel about the story or the themes presented in the story, aside from that, are there any external factors at all that play into whether or not you want, you choose, to do a script, you know, like as a DP like y'all shoot this right? Yeah, I mean sometimes. I mean, obviously the schedule. There's all that lifelife schedule right on the schedule, for sure. I mean there are multiple I mean, yeah, family situations, closeness, where it is location wise, who actors, people are involved. Yeah, there's a lot of things, of reasons why you want to driving find you will be money, I mean may pay well, you know. So for me personally, it'll always be a story. For me it'll always be what the story says and the message. If there's a message or if it's just an art, art piece, you know, it's it starts there for me. Okay, cool. So, so you've read the script, you you store your Hook. This is it. You've chosen yes, you've said yes. Now you've done the little things where you read it first just to enjoy and then you reading it now to for technical things. You're like, Oh, you know, let me go back and let me read this again, let me take some notes. You've timed it, you know, so you more or less know. Okay, it's going to be. You know, these are this, all that stuff. Now the next major step. You have a common station with the director, right, and at that point the conversation is to like do we see this the same right, because we all know you can have the same exact script two different directors. You get two different movies, completely different movies, even if it's written by like an Oscar winning, technically perfect like script where everything is there, right, but you but two directors can look at one script and get a completely different movie. And so it's very important to then talk to the director and say what's in this director's mind? You know, what's their vision, what's their style? You know, like the mood, the approach, you know, because you know a film that takes place in the eighteen hundreds, right, some you know, and you're thinking it's going to be a real gritty, realistic, you know, piece about the human condition. Ends up like the director looks at and he's like no, I saw, I saw steampunk. You know, and you're like, all the sudden, you're like, forget it, I'm out right, you know, like. So to get on the same page super important. Yeah, absolutely, absolutely. I think that you guys will constantly be, you know, making sure that, because you're the DP, is in a way handling the imagination of the director and they have to handle it and bring it, in a way, to life. You know, he's got other team members, he's got out of crew, but you know, they're kind of piecing this...

...thing together with his visual ideas. Yeah, I mean film, his motion picture, you know. So it's like the that responsibility to bringing making the motion picture come to life falls on squirely, on the DP shoulders. And so the director has this vision, this imagination, this creative, you know, desire, with the script that they read, and now he's going to talk to you about how this motion picture is going to come to life. And so now you're discussing things like tone, style, themes, color, color Palettes, mood design, even gimmicks like, and not that it's a gimmick, but like one thousand nine hundred and seventeen, for example, shot all on one take. It's not that that's a gimmick, that was an actual choice that was made in order to tell the story. But that's the type of stuff that you discuss. You discuss those things in order to come into agreement. Now, how can, at this point, a DP contribute to the areas of tone, style, them color Palettes, mood design, etc. Like. How can, how would a DP established tone, for example, with the shots, you know, in this in this initial conversation? Like how how would that conversation go? You know, because you're you're talking about tone from a very technical perspective, the framing of the shot. So how what are the types of things that you would say if you're trying to influence the tone of the theme? Sure, things like, you know, when you're I'm talking to the director and you're discussing a shot, you're dealing with basically something called shotless. I'm sure I'm talking to people that already know a lot of this stuff, but you know, you're devising a shot list and in this shot list you are trying to have the camera communicate what the scene needs to say. You, like I mentioned earlier, you're taking lighting to shape the field and the mood and as well as the tone and feel of the scene, and you're also using movement, an equipment to be able to end up bringing it home to communicate, because the camera is also communicating something, always communicating. You may not notice it because it's subtle, but that's the beauty. So give me an example of a shot and what the shot communicates. Sure. Okay, so I'm sure a lot of people have seen one of the famous shots and jaws, where or in a lot of hitchcock movies, where you have this you know, zoom in at the same time as you don't focus shot. You know, as you Dolly out and racy rack focus well, that you know that Burdigo shot. You know that the guys going in and you're seeing his face come close but the backgrounds dropping back, that you know that creates some sort of shocks, some awe. Something just occurred. Jarring's very jarring, and it's communicating to the audience that the actor or the scene mean needs attention, something serious just happened. When you have subtle pull ins, you want to, you know, get close gets, you know, sympathize with the character or be able to, you know, get understand his mood and feel. When you pull back, you're distancing yourself away from him and small, slow Dolly pull back. It's like, you know, I'm disconnecting. He's alone. The person's alone in this world and he has no one to relate with. So well, like a fire or fifty shot, we you have this confrontation where it's basically like this and the two people are talking and you're realizing, you know, you've seen, you know, people who play video games would know this, because you know you have this versus, you know, but you know this challenge. So you have that fifty shot, which is basically two people, you know, a three shot, you have someone, three people walking together, talking, they're discussing. You know, they're together, joint unified in this plan or in this pursuit. There's lots of different types of shots. They'll all have names, they all give they all communicate the story just as much as dialog and the action in the scene. Perfect. Yeah, absolutely, and you know now often times that it's also really dependent on the type of director that you're working with too, you know, and how much they're going to allow the DP to influence those types of things with chat choices, because they're believe it or not, there are directors out there that they come and they've got their shots, shock choices, they've got their ideas, they're thinking on that level as well. And especially all tours, you know, directors that consider themselves all tours where they take complete authoritative action over the entire creative process, you know, and they become the author of the film. And we don't have time to get into an outward theory, but needless to say that these types of directors that take kind of the reins and and kind of essentially, it's not that they're cutting off collaboration, but collaboration isn't necessarily their primal focus or desire. You know, it kind of stifles a little bit what the deep can bring to the table. Nevertheless, you still, I...

...mean, you have a huge responsibility on your shoulders and just by the fact that you're, you know, controlling that camera and operating that camera, you are influencing the story and it's great if this stuff that's discussed and advance, you know, and that that that that collaboration and the rapport between DP and directors established right off the bat, and that's so. Yeah, yeah, I mean the DP and the director. You know, they say that when people read books. The reason why books are so fun to read. Is because people create their own imagination. When the deep in the director on the same page, they have the same imagination. They are able to envision the story in their minds and you know, especially when they're in the process of doing the storyboard, they're fully on a board with how this thing is going to okay, okay, so now you've talked to the director, you've had a ton of meetings in and we're going to talk a little bit about what happens specifically during those conversations, because there's all sorts of things. There's the other storyboarding the shots. We're going to get to that before we even go there. As you're reading the script, I'm sure you're doing a breakdown in your mind right because there is a physical breakdown that happens and we're going to talk about that as well. But just before you get into the paper you're reading it, you're probably also thinking about your team. You're thinking about okay, you know, as if it's a small indie film, you're probably going to have a small team, if it's a large studio film, you're probably going to have a large team. But let's talk about a look some of the key players in the DP's department and some of your team members and what they do, especially for audience members that you know that they don't know. They don't know this stuff, they don't know what goes in to like all of the people that are in charge of just the camera department, for example. If you can talk a little bit about some of those key players. Yeah, well, when you're in a film production set, a lot of the times the TP's the guy that's kind of got the leads the crew with all the equipment and all the gears. And, for instance, you know you have camera operators, you have people who what's so where is this Chacuy? So what's the difference? Why? Like, why would you, a DP, have a camera operator versus himself operating? Well, a lot, aside from union rules we're not going to get into you are a lot of times you have a guy probably better than you. You know, you that you snoke nost to hand. Stronger, yeah, and sometimes even stronger, younger, younger exactly, and you, for instance, I know Shane her what it's like to be behind the Monitor. You know he likes to watch the scene in a video village and just kind of just focused on the shot. He has his team that knows exactly what to do because he has created the shot list and everything that needs to be done, how it's done, and they are looking at the list and everybody in the department knows what to do. And so the operator is the guy holding the camera and just following orders, you know, and he's, you know, capable of do this. But there are other operators out there, like steadicam operators. What was what is the steady cam operator? So steadycam operator is Solo Guy who runs a rig that has a Schanical mechanical arm that holds the weight of the camera and basically what he does is he stabilizes. It is a sub sort of stabilizing shot. You know, when you're running or when your want a room that's tight, you can't have all these large equipments that you want to be able to pull in pull out. It's it's really to give mobility and smoothness to the shot to one person, not equipment. And today there are so many different stabilization methods. Is I mean Trinity Greg Now that's the big thing. The stabilize. There's a Bo glide, there's the yeah, then there's the old school steadicam, which is an actual name. It's not, you know, but that's come become synonymous with the position. So yeah, okay, so you've got a steady came up roll on the solder mounts. That's an operator, you know. I know that. You know you need some strong people to operate the Imax camera. So you probably have two people on. It's interesting that you say that, because Hoytman, Hoytma. Oh, yeah, I said he does it all the time. So, yeah, he just literally throws that beast on his shoulder and you know, he's a big dude, he's a big guy and he just throws the whole thing on his shoulder and he runs a masterclass. He was talking a little bit about his Master Class Teaching Imax filming and he says at the first thing that students do is order when they come in. is like they're intimidated. They're intimidated by this imax families. Like, don't get intimidated by it, you know, like just grab it, grabmits, put it on the should to get a feel for it. Sure you'RE gonna get tired after a little bit, but just you know. Yeah, you can see him in interstellar when that things on his shoulder and he was just moving around with it behind the sounds like wo our thing is massive. Yeah, the the sound, the loud...

...sound, apparently, is what it's like having a generator right next to your ear. So yeah, so, I mean, but you can get us a strong down operator, a himmle that for you. Yeah, I mean there are people out there that have become masters, that are operating certain things, for instance, steady operators, drone operators, there's a lot of different equipment out there to give you different types of shots and stabilizations. That's just operators. And in the production right then you have people in the crew that are involved in setting up and putting things, putting rigs together. You have gaffers, well, just just grass, the camera department, just the camera depart so you have follow focus. So you have first they see, second I see. What? Why do you need to well, the first they sees, I mean the focusing these cameras today. The first they see does that. And so basically what he does is he has his own little monitor, whether it's either attached to the side of the camera or on a stand or right in some other location, and he's literally just focusing the shot, you know, so that the actor stays in focus at all times or he's able to rack focus to the into the subject or the item that needs attention. You know, a lot of these lenses have a depth of field where, you know, you want to get a nice clean shot of the actor and so you want to blow out the background if you want to just kind of focus on the scene at at hand, or you want a wide open, Wide Angle Lens view of everything in the scenery. So, you know, they open up that aperture so you know they can, they could see the whole scene. So this, Gosh, I mean this. Yes, there's a lot to but but they're very important because right focusing either, you know, fast movement is a very hard thing, or even slow movement. You know, slow pullens too are shot and they have to, you know, the know the distance between them and the actor, them of the subject, and they're the ones that measure those distances between the cameras and actors in order to know how much the camera is traveling in the focus is traveling. That's cool. So that's first they see. Second a see is usually they're a clapper. Basically, they slate, you know, and they also take their kind of the in between there, like the bridge between. You know, they handle all the equipment to, you know, see, they're there that when the lenses is taken out, there's this, you know. You know, they other guys who you trust as well to be able to transfer the lenses and the cameras, as well as the footage and all the stuff, to give it to the the technical director, the the digital imaging tech, you know, the guy who handles all that footage, to upload it, which is dit, and he'll usually kind of just upload everything and take it from the second they see. It's so second see is important. You know, he's very least not just sitting now and then they're recording everything that you can the recording shots. They're taking notes. They probably have two slates because they've got all that data. Right, yes, and I was they're going through what the camera slate is calling. So he has to write all that. Right. There's around. Yeah, okay, so then. Okay, so you brought up the dit, who is always like the camera expert. Right. The DIT is the guy that is, for example, if you have some sort of technical issue on your you know, Metadata, you know, an importing Meta data in order to you know, kind of for your camera and for monitors and just to have clear communication between all that. Your dit is there. But what else is your dit doing? I mean besides, I mean he he's also correct me if I'm wrong, but he's also the one that's helping like Loadin lts and left and yet up tables and colors and all that. mean he's the usually they're like a color scientist or someone that like. Yeah, there's technically sad. Yeah, him and along with the data wrangler, they usually involved. A Wrangler will make sure the footage is organized, all set brought in, and the Di Thedt is really also along with him setting up protest. I mean Dante could could have a big role. I mean he could be doing dailies and editing along there with probably another editor in kind of showing him all the footage that's come in and organizing and setting it up along with the editor. So, like you know, he could be heavily involved in the day of but but a lot of times he's the guy who handles everything. Who who who text the able to yeah, the footage Randall's the footage and the wrangler is essentially getting it from camera to hard drives, backing it up. Yeah, writing all that down...

...for the editors and getting all that and all that to the editors and making sure that everything's organized. Okay, so a lot of these things, a lot of these departments, they sometimes dabble into each one. Yeah, especially in an indie set. And he said, yeah, exactly. That's in Hollywood. You got like hundreds of people doing like one little thing right. So it's, you know, and an indie set you kind of write because, like in an indie set you would never have a video assist operator, you would never have someone whom is whose soul job is literally the set up the viewer for the director, you know, and to set up video village for the director, or to set up, you know, like monitors and to make sure that the monitors are perfectly calibrated to which is a big deal. Actually, I know of a monitor so that you can be determining exactly the footage that's coming in. Is like is it good? Is it clean? What does it look like? You know, but like in an indie set, you don't, you don't necessarily get that right. It's like it's probably like the second AC or the first they see or the even the deep blue team like itself this thing. Yeah, and then oftentimes you've got a PA or a couple pays that are crammer trainee and they're training up and you know they're they're the guys that are fetching, holding things, and you know, just hand over the rag, let him hold it for a little bit. But but you know, sometimes there's a misconception that a PA is just like a glorified you know, like coffee. Go get her, go for it's like, no, they're training. Yeah, they're getting of all. Sometimes, especially in our sets, we want to make sure that they actually hands off, because I know I've passed over like the like the big fiftyzero cameras over and then they're they're holding the things. You Trust me? I'm like, yeah, you got to feel it, you got to break the ice of of the movie world and just kind of get your hands on and and play with this thing. And that's kind of how we are. Yeah, that's how we are. Only imagine if our like, you know, this like high school sixteen year old, and you know I'm on and on. Even on an indie set. You know, there's this fifty fiftyzero already. I'll let you know, Alex a mini and you know it's all put together. But, bunny, you saying the Hointmentnout, because that's kind of the way we are. Take it, man, yeah, play with it. I mean you, you, you, you, you've been just setting yourself so apart. You got some point. You gotta Yeah, got touch. We play around with it. Yeah, that's yeah, because that's how we mean. We were kids were like Oh, this Ari Ari, you know, I want to play with the Ri cameras or I want to pay with the red and it's just likely have a little point and shoot. Right. You know, when you builds this is, you put it on a pedestal and then, like you realize, once you've handled you realize it's just a tool. Yeah, it's the tools, a little exacts a tool. Yeah, there's sometimes and maybe the wrong tool for the job, of the right tool for the job and put it on a pedestal, look for the right tool. Right. That's cool. So you've got your team so well, well, chances are, unless you're on a big Hollywood else do, that's not your team. Right. It could just be you and two other guys, right, or three other guys tops in an indie actually in commercial work as well. You know, you have, like, yeah, just a few, you have your video and come a lot of times the deep has his crew. That's trend. They go everywhere. It's right, that's right. Okay, so that's that's a that's actually a really big point that you know, that I do want to bring up. Like in a studio film, the building of a team oftentimes takes different roads, right, because this is this is a studio film and these are there are union rules that apply on an union set, and even on an independent film set, where there are union rules that apply. But like on a studio set, oftentimes the DP doesn't necessarily get a chance to choose everyone. Sometimes those teams get put together by people above their pay grade, right, you know, like you're going to be working like sometimes, you know, they'll say you're going to be working with this guy, you gonna be working with that guy. Oftentimes, the the more experience a DP has, the more he's able to kind of say, no, these are the my guys, this is what I'm going to bring onto the team. But like it's not like a DP can choose his gaffer, right, you know. Like, but on an indie set, when an indie set, on a small set, if you worked with a gaffer that you really like, that you get along with, and you guys have worked together a lot and he's really quick at setting up, you know, rigs and lights for you, and so he there's mean. Yeah, he understands your vision and he understands how you like things and how you like soft how do you like to soften the light and wrap them like, because you work together and you guys now no longer have to like explain everything. There's almost a shorthand, you know, there's a there's a vernacular that you speak. You could just go, you know, and he knows. Oh Yeah, you want me to? You want me to put an acreit, you know, like you you are Lenis. Take that thing down exactly, exactly, and so on a on a studio set, like when we've never done the studio film. So like we're just speaking based off of like our research and what we know. You know, you wouldn't necessarily get that kind of an option, but it on an indie film set like yeah, you get you get that option nine out of ten times. You know, there may be situations where you don't where if you're a beginner and you're being brought into the project. They may not trust your opinion, I don't know, but you get that option. So oftentimes, though, when studios put that together, studios are hopefully what they're looking for is what are...

...the winning combinations? What are combinations that we know not only one make a beautiful film but too are sure to be a blockbuster success. And over the course of cinema history we've gotten some pretty awesome combinations of director DP's the first thing. First one I can think of right off the back, as I'm always thinking from a director's perspective, is Christopher Nolan. Right, you got Christopher Nolan and wally fister, and that's when you get inception, you get the the DC knight rises, you get, you know, the Batman movies, or Christopher Nolan, and now he's no longer with wally. He's now with Joy van Hoima, and that's when you get dunk Kirk and I feel like it's even better films. But then again that's also a little bit of Christopher Nolan growing. Yeah, but you got, you know, you got Don Kirkin into stellar, right, and so like, and they tend to stay together. They tend because it's like you build a bond, you build a community with them. You got like the Cohen Brothers with Roger Dickinson. Yeah, they've done like eight or nine films together and they're famous for working together and they put out phenomenal films. Yeah, and Quittin, Tarantino, Richardson. Yep, Yep, that's right. Catherine bigelow and Barry ackroyd. She did they did the hurt locker, which is one like you know, that's one of my my top S, but she also did Detroit, the new one that just came out, Detroit, with that same DP and and she's probably, you know, they're probably growing in their relationship together. You got a Fonso qual Rome and Lubski. HMM. Yeah, and you know, children of men, one of our favorite, both of us, one of our favorite gravity. Yeah, visually beautiful me to my moth. I'm ying. That's actually are like real. You know, they're they did that together. And then, you know, then you've got David Fincher and Jeff Krone Let. Then you know, you got fight club and some you know, and social network. Gone girl, the girl with the with the Dragon Tattoo, and you can see that when into they start working together, that styles, but there's a visual language that's formed, you know, and you can tell. It's like, AH, this is, you know, this is a Colin Brother Roger Deacon Film. Me Tell you can see the the visual style, and they're usually the ones that are award winning. When you take the great director with the Great DP, you put them together and you've got you've got your Oscar content. Yeah, and you even have directors that a elevate, you know, DP's. For instance, you have villain Guev and Bradford young in arrival. I mean, yeah, that movie was great and it really elevated bread. First, I mean bred for young was talent, very talented, but but then he but then he is brilliant, brilliant director, and his style is beautiful. You can see it in two thousand and forty nine and the lighting. I mean that was a lot of pressure and he nailed it. Would Deacon. So you have people that are good and then directors can take those DP's to an eleven. Sometimes they're both good, but but the synergy between the two of them, the collaboration, makes them both better. That's like what we talked about last week. But like you can have an Oscar winning actor for the bad role and it'd be a bad film. But you can have an okay or good actor for the perfect role. Yeah, and it's a great, phenomenal film and character. Right. The same thing with the relationship between a DP and at a director, you know, like if they can both be good, but if it's the right marriage between the two, they both become great. Yeah, right. And and you have also you have moments like I just thought about this, where you have new directors and you have amazing DPS. You know, like, for instance, you have Angelina, who hired a yeah, or you have what's his name, Matt Levitteque, who did the Star Stars, one stars born, and like, you know, he's a really good actor. Brad, no, rather cooper, Bradley Cooper, yeah, Radley Cooper, who directed that movie, and delighting the quality. I mean you have a phenomenal DP. So sometimes and works the other way. It works the other way around where you have a new director and you know, you hire to peace. He Yeah, you know ideas, and I'm gonna need you so much. That exactly, and and the film is just pulled off brilliantly. You know, sometimes you do need that actor direct story. Sometimes you get DPS that turn to directors because, like, they realize that they bring something great. That's what happened with wally fister right right, you know, like he got to a point after having made these huge blockbusters with Christopher Nolan, here he's like, I'm going to start directing. I don't know if it was the right choice, to be honest with you. That's another conversation for another day. Nevertheless, he was great, but he was great with Christopher Nolan. But because he was great, I think in his mind he was like, okay, I'm ready to direct and you know what, maybe he'll mentually home make something that's great. But you are absolutely right. A great DP will also elevate a first time director, which is why it's so important for you directors out there to find yourselves a wonderful DP and when you have...

...one that not only is good but you like connect with, just don't let him go. Don't let him go, because they are responsible for creating your vision. I mean they are, they are the person. So that's cool. So now in independent films you don't necessarily have a studio executive that's making teams right, like they're being made by the director or producer, the financier or like an angel investor or someone you know, anyone like. It could or it could just come organically together because of an idea, you know, like we built teams of that kind of comments a result of a community theater group, right, and so there are many ways that these teams can come together. And sometimes, like, for example, of you're brought in, you bring your guys with you, and sometimes someone can be kind of given to you, right, like hey, Jonathan, like you've got your team that you work with whenever you're you know, you're dpeeing a film, and thence they can say, I know you've got your team, but check this guy out, let me, let me put this guy into your into your team, and you bring a million and along or her along, and it's those times where, for those of you that get brought into like a set for the first time, like be excellent, be good, be someone that's like exciting to work with, someone that is positive, that is looking for solutions, that is eager and enthusiastic to be there, and it's thankful to be there, because who knows, you could literally at that moment be in your job interview and become part of that team. Yeah, and be brought into that team. Every opportunity that you're on a set as an opportunity to like be on your next set. So that's just a little pro tip. Will protecol little ahead of the tip. Yeah, so be excellent. All right. So now the process of the DP and their team. So first thing you've got the script breakdown. Johnth what's a script break down? Boy? Yeah, so basically you are creating, you know, you're going down the script and you are marking the timing length of shots and you are trying to visually see, you're trying to write down visually how the movie is going to look. So you're already do down, Gosh, like the little lines and the stretore. Yeah, and all exactly. You mark a line down and you try to figure out how long that shot is from top to barnom right, and that line represents a camera or that line represents the light of the shots, just the length of the shot. The squiggly is where the act, the dialog, is happening. Okay, I'll far that. If the shot goes through dialog, then you have that screw Lego to dialog. There's a lot of videos out there, yeah, that show this stuff and they have what does. The film right does a really good job of showing how they do there. So I mean some people do things a little differently here and there. The LAD notes still have questions on there. So script breaks that you doing what's already been a tutorialized out there. Is there anything unique that you like to do that most people don't do for your script breakdowns? Um, so I like to I like to kind of overload a scene with shots and kind of breakdown which one does the best job. So if I say, I go down the list and I see this shot, I could do a drone because it the drone will say this, I could do this and I'll say that and nows and so I'll have a lot of shots written down on just one other, different angles, different types of shots in that one shot and kind of just slowly narrow out with you one conversation and conversation or just personally be like no, this one says it the best. So it's a way for me to kind of like you're dialoging with the scripts, like you're talking to the script. You're like, how are you going to show me this shot right okay, you're from the know, this one says it. Yeah, there's that can force. A lot of times you're reading the script and there's a shot in your mind you're like this is so a drone shot, this has to be a drone shot, but you never considered the hundreds of different types of shots that are possible to tell the same thing right and probably less more cost effective sure as well. So you have to really think, think like that. As a director, yeah, you have to try to expand your ability to see the scene spoken differently, but the message is capt have you ever, like, gotten to a point where, I'm sure they've been situations where, when you're breaking down a script, you're like, okay, I could, I could tell this with these two different shots. I could, I could do it with this one, I could do with this one. This one's going to cost more money, this was going to cost less money, but I could go either way it. has there ever been a situation where you like, there's only one way to tell this shot? Yees. So I would say the best type of filming is when you say everything that you need to say and the least amount of shots. Because, for instance, I remember in Cicario there's a long shot...

...after they get out of the Mexican border and you have all the the guys, all the tension shot, and the moment they arrive to their hide their their their hideout area, or wherever it was in the movie. It was a longdistant shot for like thirty, forty seconds. The argument was far away. And and they're just complaining and they're like what the heck was that? And and and she just stands there and they all walk away, like they don't really look at him, and she's were distant away from her because she's alone, she's confused. Yeah, they're in their routine, this is every day and it's just a long take and for me it said everything that I need to say. I was just bombarded with so much suspense that I personally needed to get away, just like her. So the the the DP knew that, deacons, we needed to rust I can, we needed to exp we needed to this is what she feels like. Yeah, and so that did so much. It didn't just I mean, it told you the story, but it also told you the emotions of the character, but it also put an emotion in you. Yeah, yeah, exact, and that's what a great shot. Choice does, and so you say that sometimes you'll start with many of them and you'll deduce it. Yeah, and sometimes there's like, no, it's only this one. Yeah. So I personally feel like we really, we really did a very good job in underground, especially on the outdoor scene. Yeah, the outdoor scenes had no coverage. Yeah, everything was this is the shot that we're doing a shot. Yeah, because everything was told with those what four or five shot? Well, though, I guess it was the one, the one moment of coverage that we did coverage when we did the the when they're looking at each other and then they go to yeah, right before they go to shoot. Yeah, but, yeah, you're right, you know, yeah, right. Yeah. So, if you see it, it's on Youtube. It's a short film that we did, and I think that one was shot very well, and that's kind of the idea that I mean. It's, you know, you have a lot when you're breaking down the script, but you get rid of everything that it's repetitive and you choose the few, if not to one shot. Yeah, that says everything that you need to say. Cool, moving on, we've got so much to cover. Yeah, so something that we do that not a lot of people do. In fact, very few do. It's very common in television. In fact it's necessary and television. It's a must and television, but not in film. It's rare. Is a like a Story Bible, a look book or a Vision Board? Yeah, now vision boards, boards are more common in films. You see those every once in a while. Sometimes people do it on pinterest and stuff like that, or they'll have an actual vision board or like a look book. You know, they'll create a Google dog with a look book. But we take it to another level and we actually turn almost every short or feature that we're working on into a story Bible. We taught talk a little bit about that, just a little because we talked about it in the past, but just the reason behind it. Please you add to it. So we want to make sure from a DPEACE perspective, just from the camera perspective. Yeah, I mean what we want to do is, again, we know that there's a lot that's been done out there that there's kind of no reason to if there's a technique that we know says something, we use it. And a lot of times what we do is we're digging through the Internet and finding elements shots, color, corrections, color gratings. Yes, things like that aspires. That inspires the story and will best tell a story. I mean you'll see simplest things. Is like a wall being read in a shot says a lot different, says something completely different than a yellow wall on a scene. So you will have, you know, a lot of these elements in this look book to, you know, to you know, create the mood, to feel story totally start for us, I think in correct me if I'm wrong. It's also about communication. Yeah, you know, I think that if everybody has access to this document, I feel like we're all on the same page and we all know this, then we're all making the same movie. Yeah, absolutely, the moment actor looks at this, they'll know. Ah, I feel it already and I see it already. That's a lot of times when people say when they see it. Cool. So the next thing that we do is location scouting. Now, why is location scouting important for the DP? Well, without a location it's hard to vision how to move around the space like. So do you think DP should go on location scouts or do you think that should be something that, like a photographer, knows? Absolutely, without a doubt, I think DEP should be at every location.

Sometimes a director may not, but a DP you're yeah, I mean I personally, for me, I would say has to. I know that there are other DPS who kind of know so well educated and their equipment and what they have and their team and their communications that they could send somebody a proxy and be like go or like they could just trust their their their location. That you need to be but personally, for me, you need to feel the space as well. You need to hear the sounds it makes. You got a step, walk around, touch, feel, see where lights could go. You know how things would bounce in the room. You know you need to take three hundred and sixty shots. You need to take photos like crazy. Do you take video? You've got a you know, sometimes even bring the actor, if they're available, with you. You know, sometimes times, I know that. Sorry, today I'm when we did that, we did the front ground. Yeah, yeah, so, you know, put the actor inside the space. I had an idea already of what the blocking was going to be like and I was just like walk around the space and just get a feelful what this is going to be like. You know, we did it like a month out, in a month when we're actually inside the space. So yeah, but but you had a better example, I think. No gettings in New York. Actor, phenomenal actor Daniel Danny Lewis, has gone on location scouts with the team and they'd be like I need to go and feel an experience. And sometimes it's good because you can record them, record them in the environment. You can see how light hits their face. You know that's because that's deeper spaces. A shape differently and like job hits skin. You know women there's certain lenses of look great on women versus men, and so you have to see how how the environment will look on the campus and inside are the character that this is something interesting that happened. When I want on location scouting for underground, there was one of the days when we went to new Bedford and we had a kind of a big team that went with us. Alana, who used to be the producer for this, for this podcast, she had what she went, molly, who was an associate producer for the film, went, and a wrist of who was an actor in the film went and while we were there and we were touring some of the locations, we were able to sneak into a tour of the whaling museum and it wasn't something that was planned, it was just something that ended up happening because of the connections that we had made. As a result of that tour, she received some insight about life as a woman in one eighteen hundreds new Bedford, Massachusetts. That impacted her in a way where she made character choices as a result of that. And then when we went into the space, the things that she had heard in the tours started to come to life inside the space. And so now she's had this experience, as you know, a risk of the researcher actor trying to become character inside us very specific space, and it is now. Would started already the creation process, you know. And I was able to see that and see the parts of the locations that really spoke, you know, to her and and and be like, okay, this part of this area is really like what feels like home to the her. Yeah, so I'm going to use that to my advantage right, block it, right so that because that's where she's comfortable, right, you know, and that happened. And Yeah, and you can tell actor, you know, and they're in the set. You can see all this space the textures of it just don't match well with her personality, right, and who she is, and so there's so many elements in that. And, interestingly enough, I had the OPT I had a very interesting situation with Tommy, who played, you know, her husband in the short, who never got to see the set prior to it. But then when he went in, as a result of his relationship ever home her, he could see where the the comfortable area inside the home was. It was very interesting. It was a very interesting thing that happened as a result of a locals and scouting. Yeah, sometimes you even want to also want to mention key grip scaffers. I mean, these guys are they have to find blueprints of where lights are going to go, power all these ethic kind of hole in the roof, yeah, rig here there, things like that. So you don't want to sometimes be the only guy in your department there because there's so many things that will involve a particular shot that you need your crew to be there to kind of think of ideas on how to handle a small location. You know, right, that's so too hard to do a shot. You've got your location, you've scouted in. Now you've drawn your set designs and your drawings, and a lot of that is also connected to the production designer and the art department and working together and tandem to create these things. But you've got your set, you've got your blueprints of your sets, you've got your location scouted and now you're creating your top down, Yep, top down kind of drawing the that the the blueprint or the yeah, the the blueprint of the set, so you know where the lights are, you know where the actors are moving and blocking, you know what the cameras will be, you know where the sound equipment will be, so that everyone knows what the shot entails. Of there's there's good programs out there.

This cheap programs out there that actually stop talking about. Yes, talked about shot designer. Shot designer. Yeah, we've talked about that as a tip in the past, but bring it back in and this one because it's very important. But shot designer. It was actually a friend of our, RS Andrew Howe, referred that to us a few years ago. That's right, just like you done it, I shot designer. We always drew everything and we always thank you. Learn you how. Yeah, we always kind of just put all the stuff and on paper. And here I'm not a drawer timelling yourself. Just do this and it did and it sped up my process. I was able to focus on other stuff. I don't know if it's free anymore. I think it's like thirty dollars. It's not that expensive. It's pretty cheap. Yeah, okay, yeah, they have all the cool stuff that I've mentioned in the in the podcast before. So you've created your top downs, which is basically a bird's eye view of your set and your actors in it and the lights plot and your grid and how that's going to affect them, but that doesn't always tell the story how it's going to be visually pulled off. And then there's the phase of storyboard. Yeah, so, I mean that's locations huge because in you'll know visually how the location is. You'll be able to put it into the storyboard. The storyboard really brings to life everything. Now it's the pre visualization, previs of the film movie. Yeah, and there are other things that, outside of storyboard, help to pre visualize that you can leave in amatics exactly like that. Yeah, absolutely, You could do d motion graphics stuff like sin a tracer by Matt Workman, and there's so many other things that you could do, but I mean really, storyboard is the key. You need your storyboard. It's quick, it's easy, it's something that everyone can see and quickly visualize what it is. It's great to tell everybody this is what we're going there now there are some directors, for example, that like to storyboard the entire film, like the CONIN brothers are famous for, just like storyboarding everything. Yeah, but then there are some that are like and just I've got my shot list, I've got top downs, I'll just storyboard the really complicated scenes. How do you? Way? Do you fall in that and that spectrum? Well, and what we've done before, yeah, is we've pretty much storyboarded every scene. Yeah, and because, again, it is so important, so important to pre visualize everything. Just previs everything, because it is better to previsit and have an idea and think on the fly then to not previs everything and think of the fly and eat time and money, you know, escaping you. We compared it to like training, right, like when you're when you're training, and for like, for track, for example, like there's a ton of technique Rp you do in your a skips be skips sea, skips, marches, Karaoka, all that stuff. Constantly, constantly, constantly, training and training and training. When you go on the day of the race, you're not thinking about, Oh, I've got a I've got a claw, you know skip. No, it's like you've done it so much, you've done so much previs and so much prep you let it go now and you are prepared in case anything were to happen. But that quick. Yeah, they'll be happy surprises when you previous versus, you know, long disaster ass right, like all, I didn't know I needed generator. It's for those indies, you know, like I didn't know any generator here. You know, I didn't plan because I didn't know that this shot need. You know, it's just it could be a disaster. So take the time previous look into sin a trace or I know it's on steam and steam. It's on steam. I think it's always. That's the only way it's been on. It's on steam and allows you to D visualize the scene with lights. It's really cool. Yeah, and then once cinematography database releases, all is he's doing some? is He doing some of Treiser? Yeah, it's a okay. Yeah, all right, cool. So now, so you've got a storyboard or you've gone all out and you've created an animatic, which is storyboards that have mount to life with motion sound. Even sometimes actors will say some of the lines and voices and things like that. Depends on how extensive you want to go. There's some pretty cool animatics actually. of You Google or youtube search the animatics for Tony Stark, it's it wasn't vengers, it was iron man, but the one with the MANDALORIAN. Which one was that one could have been the one where his whole house gets destroyed. There's some pretty cool if you google it in Youtube and you can find some really awesome animatics and see how that stuff like helps because it like when you watch that and then you watch the movie, are like, Oh wow, they've already created the whole movie. It saves you time. It saves you money, big time on money, because you're no longer like creating extra you know exactly what you need to take, the angles that you need to take.

It's a really cool thing. Yeah, anyway, so now you've got your shooting schedule's been given to you. Your reviewing your shooting schedule. You're coming up with your day preps. Well, the shooting schedule is once you have the shot list, you hand that over. You know, right, you've got yeah, you've got a first ad that's working with a line producer to create a shooting schedule. Right, and and you're very integral in that process because you're saying, look, here, all the shots, here, all of the scenes he has. How this is breaking down in that first stad is building this right with your line producer. And so now that you've got this, now you know, okay, you this is the equipment that I need, and so now you're making your equipment tool acquisition. You know, camera lenses, camera tests. You got to test your lenses, you got to test your cameras. I mean talk very briefly about that process. There's a different tool for every project, every thing. Needs to make sure that you are not using something just because of the fact that it's what everyone else does. You have to make sure you use the right tool to tell the right story and a lot of times and a lot of times the biggest thing that does that is lenses. There's so many lenses out there and they all visually show different things and some have aberration. Yeah, exactly. That's exactly, so keep it sure it is. You have to go to a local rental house and most of the really good ones will let you do it. They'll go in there and you can I just test a few camera lenses because I have an idea for this film and they'll help you. They really will. Most places are really cool. We're really blessed here in New England to have rule Yep, down the street. I mean we're in Medford and rule is literally up the street. Rule and Lens Protago, Lens Protago and conquered. They've been really cool. They actually let you play with a whole bunch of different was they trying to find? Wow, yeah, they were trying to find some really old Russian lenses. Yeah, Tony was awesome. I ended up working with Tony and he's like, dude, go in there and just have a g I have a good time. And so most rental houses, if you're serious and they see that you're serious and you've rented from them before, they're really cool about allowing you to come in and test and do some camera tests and stuff like that. And Paul the owner is like super chill. He's a really awesome at last her to go awesome guy. I mean my first go to Lench Prot Togo, because, you know, a lot of times with the a film relationship with the yeah, with the indie films that we've done the past. They mean they have everything we need. Yeah, they've been super helpful. They go above and beyond. They literally bend all the backwards to help you get to help us out. And then rules kind of the bigger rental house in the area. Yeah, they deal a lot with a lot of Hollywood films and stuff, but they're really cool too, and they do a ton of free like tutorials and teachings. They'll bring people in and they'll talk about like lighting. They'll do an entire like masks and a lot of that stuff is like just outreach for the community and it's pretty cool. You should check out like local rental houses because they've got all sorts of events and things like that and they can help you with your a DP to just like learn the tools. So cool. So you've done that. You've done your camera tests, you've done your testing of equipment, you've got your equipment list, you know how you're going to shoot this thing. You've got your production meetings. Now where you're going to meet with the the bigger team. It's not just the director. Now you're meeting with you know, like the production designer, you're meeting with gaffers. You guys are just kind of talking about how this thing is going to be executed. And then finally you've got rehearsals where you've got to rehearse sometimes some complicated scenes, complicated maybe vfx shots or stunt shots or, you know, stuff where there's like fire or things like that, or complicated blocking and your and you do your rehearsals with your the DP actually gets time to rehearse. Also with the camera. There's a long track and shot. You got to rehearse the track, things like that. And then finally, after all of that, filming begins. Yeah, yeah, and it has to be that way if you want a successful production, if you want people to take you seriously, you have to go that route. You have to take your time to do all of that before you even get behind the camera and start record. That's a lot of responsibility of the behind the DP. That's a lot. I don't know. People. People often they just they see the guy with the camera, you know, they see the tip of the iceberg. They don't know everything that's underneath. All of that has happened before they've even gone to do a single day of shooting. That's a ton. And it's not just the DP. Every department head is right. Yeah, they have their own lists. Absolutely that I'm deformiting that that is dependent on the DP and vice versa, you know. So they all kind of work together. You know, you have the production designer who is, you know, instrumental to a to the visual element of you know, the sets and everything like bad hard, and so you know you'll work as a DP, you're working directly with him and how the scene needs to be lad and all these differ things swords and it's interesting because no matter how much you prepare, no matter how much...

...you plan, no matter how perfect it is on a film set it's like Murphy's law is King. It always rules, you know, like it whatever can go wrong will go wrong. The way that I see Murphy's laws like, you know, like a horror film, you know, like the the in any horror film or like a slasher film, the that the bad guy that's got the Nife, he's always going to come after these relentless no matter how many times you try to stop them. He's relettingly, is a coming at you until he's got you corner. It's like the Guy Co commercial, like why don't we just give into that running car? It's like it's always gonna get you because no matter what, somehow you're just going to end up behiding behind the chainsaws. Right, you know. And but the cool thing about having gone through that process, you said it best, is that now you've got in you tools to navigate Murphy's law. So, so now Murphy's law is no longer errors and disasters. They're actually opportunities, right, for creating right. Yeah, exactly. You know, they're beautiful mistakes, or I think there's a better saying for that, happy mistake. Happiness there, happy occurrences. Yeah, but you get the point. I mean, you get beautiful coincidences, happy coincidences. Yeah, where now you have this situation where it's really that new road out of the hundreds of roads that you've created to try to tell this story and organize and fix and make sure, if this happens, I'll do this, if that happens, I'll do that, you know, and so you know you'll you have been able to build enough confidence to know how to handle, and that also takes a lot of experience, just doing a lot of movies in knowing when things happen. A lot of times it's usually the same thing. You know, the something runs out of battery, right, you know, the footage is full or the lights burst, or but a break or a rig of breaks or snaps or falls or you know, or this or gone missing or you know exactly. So it's like, you know, camera explodes in a card, you know I mean. And so it's like and it kind of you know, that's it doesn't some something always goes not according their plan. Something always goes down front of us. I remember for us, I'll quickly say one scenario we had. I devised a I maximize the potential of a GG five. I remember we're filming and we had Riggs and equipment and all these things that were attached to because, you know, we wanted to give it a cinematic look, but at the same time we wanted to give it, you know, have a like Shane Hurlbert where he uses the yeah to give it kind of that. That not it was more of a realism, right. It was like an approachable, like realistic, like if, if, if you and I were to make a movie kind of thing and or older times, really something that is whatever. The point being is, you know, we're recording and because the rig I created, nothing was like all from the same companies, different companies. Yeah, the moment that battery went out in mid recording, it lost footage because it was literally as if it was powering out a hard drive while transferring over footage. Yeah, and so we're going to the DIS like, oh, so, did you guys film today? I'm the yeah, yeah, it's all right there. What do you mean? This card and so that, I mean, that was that was, that was I A and we had to, you know, find a way to tell that story to the part where we even got rid of it and used it and adjusted the story to make it, make it all work. So that's a that's another story. But yeah, that that. But, but you bring a good point what you just said there, because what we ended up doing we have to pivot, we had to shift right and we had to become creative and because we had planned so much, we were able to take what may have seemed as something going unplanned wasn't necessarily wrong. We turned it into an opportunity to be creative. Right, yes, now, like, not always, when something doesn't go according to plan, is it wrong per se? It could be that circumstances have just brought up nforeseen challenges, and I call those new opportunities. Right. It's like these are new opportunities that need to be addressed at that moment. And creativity is like is the synthesis of preparation and opportunity. When you've prepared. You've prepared, you've prepared, and a new opportunity to presents itself and you're prepared, but this opportunity comes when those two things come together and you react and you act, you do something that's like, boom, creativity. It is happening. Yet something you was happening. That's the moment of art. You know, it's like when you...

...are you've got the brush in your hand. You know and and and you you're giving that stroke, and I'm that. I mean that's just how I basee. Like art is now happening. It's no longer the technical aspect of filmmaking. It's now like when the problem solving and your subconsciousness about everything, every training and all of that that you've put in there is now coming together and you're giving a new idea, you're giving a new solution and it's artistic. And sometimes it doesn't have to be a mistake or an error. Sometimes it's just, you know, you see something you just didn't see you when you were doing all your rain previous and it's like this is just ten times better, right than what I had written down. Take the opportunity with what is better, what is more creative, what tells the story best? Don't settle with just your notes. You know, it's always better to do you know, what tells the story best. Cool, let's stop there. We're only halfway through our notes and we're already at an hour and about five minutes. Yeah, five time ittes. So let's stop there, because my next question with how, as a DP, do you handle planned versus unplanned situations? And we're going to get into really cool discussion, but we're going to say that for next week. Yeah, so this deep conversation is going to carry over. I didn't think it was, but it definitely is. Okay, so let's stop there and let's just go to our creators. Tip of the week. Did you see how many notes I just have to yeah, by a yeah, create a tip of the week. I'll go first. Okay, I had an awesome conversation. You know, I like as a filmmaker, something that I personally love doing is just observing people, and I was observing someone whom, like works in this area, just an awesome, just dude, just a cool guy, really fun person, and just watching he's a he's a instructor at a nearby Dojo, at it's, you know, it extreme Ninja and just finally just sparked up a conversation because I know that he's been in this area for a long time. He's wellknown in the area and I was just like, I wonder if he if he's done stunt choreography or if we can do fight choreography, and I'm just thinking about films and I just went to a nice start a conversation. I mean he's been in the movie kingdom with Jamie Fox, like I just found out all this wild stuff. But he wrote a book and I know you can do this. Look like it. Okay, how is this a creative tip of the week? Now? The book is awesome. The book actually talks about it's called, you know, life on the Mat. I want to make sure I've got the right title. Now I'm second guessing myself, but his first name is actually Ninja. That's as actual name is Ninja an engineering. What's that? I said, that's legit. Yeah, yeah, and and he's you know, he wrote a book and let me see, let me find it. It's right here. Yes, step on the Mat. Life Lessons of the Ninja. And what's really cool about it actually is that it's not just about like how to conduct yourself as a you know, as a martial artist. It's actually life lessons about it's actually taking martial arts and explaining life lessons about and how to apply it to yourself as a human being and as a creative because martial arts is a creative creative art. You know, it's about movement and it's about discipline. It's about a lot of things that we talked about in filmmaking. I was really impressed just him talking about his life and where he came from, Vietnam during the fall of Saigon, and him, you know, just like on a raft as a refugee, and how martial arts helped him to achieve, you know, his life as a father, as a businessman, you know, as a martial artist, as a husband, you know, just a ton of stuff. But the steps in his book break down the steps of of how one should even conduct themselves in a film set. It's really cool. I actually I'm going to share with you because I want you to read it. I'm reading it now. I'm on the second chapter. He has an entire chapter just about what it needs to bow, like when you enter into a Dojo and you bow before your teacher, and how like we bow into circumstances and situations to meaning that, like we are becoming committed, we're showing respect to it and we're staying committed to the choices that we make, and it's really cool. So I don't know, for me it was like inspiring me from a creative perspective, because it's inspired me to become an excellent filmmaker. So the title of the book, You can get it on Amazon. It's called step on the mat life lessons of the Ninja and it's by Ninja Nu Yen, and I'll have that in the show notes. Yeah, I like it. My Creator step of the week. I like it. You got I didn't have anything. Oh, but, like you said, what did you start going? A tip will come. Well, I don't have an APP. Usually I usually have an APP or something still offer. Yeah, but you know, I mean this is really a temple, you know, in the sense of like, you know, Napsis an APP you'm offering you somebody at a tip to take with you. Is when you are shot listing. Never, ever, ever...

...say to yourself, because I don't have that equipment, I can't do that shot. Never limit yourself with the equipment that you have. If it's a drone shot, write down a drone. If it's a crane shot, write down a crane. If it's a car mount, right down car mount. And then, if you can't get it, what happened, you know well, you because you have written it. When you are creating the shot, you will devise a technique that will be able to perform that shot. Okay, once you write something down, you force yourself to try to get the shot the way that you've written it, because you know, and the director has come in agreement, that that is the best way to do it. Cool, I mean that's the best way to tell a story. To tell that not exactly. So it's always better to put it down, but never limit yourself. Yeah, don't right off the bat say, Oh, I can't tell the story the best way possible because I don't have that quick right. But exactly exactly, because you have you by saying that. You've officially said that. You know that. You know I I I can't tell the story. You've a whole story. You've got. So if you need a helicopter break down, Hellica down helicopter. Exactly. I love you. Never know, you just just never know. You's skydive and hope that the scene is happening in front of you. You know, maybe both may be both. So that's that's really the tip is just, you know, there's lots it. No, it's a really good tip. That's actually a legit tip. That's a good creative tap. Cool. Well, everyone, thank you so much for joining the harvest. Our show producers, Chelsea cow we are cotton contributors haunts Adia, which is, you know, really cool to have them on board now. To support the harvest. You can visit our patreon page, Patreoncom forward slash the harvest podcast and if you've got any quick questions that you want to hit me up on twitter, you can hit me up at x Garcia, at Jonathan Harvest and for any longer questions info what Mount Harvestcom or Mount Harvest at Gmailcom both a fair game. You can shoot to US anything at all. I actually got a couple of cool questions as a result of the last podcast, which we don't have time to answer them now, but I will and the next one. Thank you, guys, so very much for joining us. I hope you enjoyed yeah, Oh, and please slap that subscribe button, share and like, please. Thanks, guys. Thank you.

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